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Notes from My Work with WebSphere Portal, Domino, and Other IBM Technology

Posts Tagged ‘Worklight

Step-by-Step Installation and Configuration of IBM WebSphere Portal V8.5

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WebSphere Portal Enable V8.5
Installation and Configuration of a Single Host Proof of Concept

an example of a configuration screen

Launching the New Config Wizard

Download Instructions
Using either IBM’s Partnerworld Software Catalog or IBM’s Passport Advantage locate the eAssembly part number CRRW9ML. The download list will include the following component parts:
IBM WebSphere Portal and Web Content Manager V8.5 Multilingual Quickstart Guide (CIYE7ML )
IBM WebSphere Portal Enable Setup V8.5 Multiplatform Multilingual IMPORTANT: All parts of this image (Setup, Install, WAS ND, SDK) must be extracted into the same directory to create an installable image (CIYW3ML )
IBM WebSphere Portal Server Install V8.5 Multiplatform Multilingual IMPORTANT: All parts of this image (Setup, Install, WAS ND, SDK) must be extracted into the same directory to create an installable image (CIYV9ML )
IBM WebSphere Portal Enable Install V8.5 Multiplatform Multilingual IMPORTANT: All parts of this image (Setup, Install, WAS ND, SDK) must be extracted into the same directory to create an installable image (CIYW4ML )
IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment V8.5.5.2 Multiplatform Multilingual IMPORTANT: All parts of this image (Setup, Install, WAS ND, SDK) must be extracted into the same directory to create an installable image (CIYW0ML )
IBM WebSphere SDK Java Technology Edition V7.0.6.1 Multiplatform Multilingual IMPORTANT: All parts of this image (Setup, Install, WAS ND, SDK) must be extracted into the same directory to create an installable image (CIYW1ML )
IBM WebSphere Portal V8.5 Remote Search and Document Conversion Services Multiplatform Multilingual (CIYW2ML )
Other Software
In order to configure the evaluation environment for conventional fault tolerance and scalability additional software components are needed.
IBM DB2 Workgroup Server Edition – Restricted Use V10.5 for Windows on AMD64 and Intel EM64T systems (x64) Multilingual (CIWN9ML ) NOTE: This may not be needed if installing a simple single host proof of concept that includes IBM Security Directory Server for which DB2 9.7 is included.
IBM Security Directory Server
IBM Security Directory Server v6.3.1 Client-Server with entitlement(zip file) for Windows Multilingual (CIS0HML )
IBM Security Directory Server 6.3.1, IM 1.7 for Windows Multilingual 
(CIS0JML )
IBM Security Directory Server 6.3.1, JDK 1.6 SR 14 for Windows Multilingual (CIS0KML )
IBM Security Directory Server 6.3.1, DB2 v 9.7 FP6 for Windows Multilingual (CIS0LML )
IBM Security Directory Server 6.3.1, eWAS 7.0.0.29 for Windows Multilingual (CIS0MML )
IBM Security Directory Server 6.3.1, GSKit 8.0.14.26 for Windows Multilingual (CIS0NML )

Unpacking Procedures
For the purpose of these notes we are doing an install on Windows Server 2012. Extraction is done using 7-zip based on prior experience with extraction using native Windows tools.
Extracting IBM WebSphere Portal Enable
Take note of the comments in the download list regarding proper unpacking in order to create an installable image. These parts should be extracted such that they form a single directory: CIYW3ML,CIYV9ML,CIYW4ML, CIYW0ML, CIYW1ML.
In addition you should extract these parts into folders of their own: CIYW2ML and CIYE7ML).
Extracting DB2 should be done into a single DB2 folder.
Extracting IBM Security Directory server should be extracted into a single IDS directory.

A complete and illustrated procedure guide is available in PDF format.  I just got too lazy to post the whole process as a blog post so be sure to take advantage of the detailed guide: Installation and Configuration of IBM WebSphere Portal Enable V8.5

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Mobile Sites That Act Like Mobile Apps

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In a recent blog entry posted by me on my company’s site I discussed IBM Worklight and a necessary distinction between mobile sites and mobile apps. Usually I continue to chew on an idea well after the deadline has passed and the content is out of my hands. Such is the case with this article. One of my projects is to assist in the completion of a new mobility workshop focused on IBM Worklight. In line with this I was looking for a way to make additional refinements in what I believe is a very important distinction.

Thus, I come to today’s title. By no means do I intend to disparage sites that look, feel, and in some ways behave like a ‘true’ mobile app. The capabilities of HTML5 are far to significant to overlook. A look at an OpenNTF project espousing such an approach demonstrates the pervasive impact of how a local cache can richly enhance a mobile site. Another technical blog I am growing to appreciate is a collaborative effort called HTML5 Doctor. One article I wish to draw your attention to was written by one of the collaborators, Mike Robinson. “Go offline with application cache” is an interesting and well written introduction to this HTML5 feature. The article describes a key artifact, the manifest file, whose purpose is to identify the other artifacts that are to be cached on the local device. In addition, and it is to this that I most want to draw your attention, the manifest file specifies a FALLBACK section that describes, “What to do when an offline user attempts to access an uncached file”.

Whew, I just burned my way through a lot of words to make the point that a mobile site can act like a mobile app in this sense: when a network is no longer available there will be some amount of information in the form of files (css, html, javascript) and data that can behave in a potentially useful way. It is more than simply having a UI that is “responsive” to the device’s form factor. (Not that this is a bad thing).

There remains a vital distinction and that is this, an efficient, elegant, and rich offline feature set is ultimately bound to employ some features and probably some binary code that is device specific. This is where, from an enterprise perspective, IBM Worklight is a welcome and powerful ally for developers and solution architects. I can easily imagine a project team consisting of core Worklight developers, Android Java developers, iOS Objective C developers, and others working together to deliver applications with consistent look and feel AND with extraordinary capabilities whether on or off line.

At some point in the near future (I hope) I will have some concrete example to discuss.

Written by David Wilkerson

August 16, 2012 at 9:01 pm

Worklight: A Mobile Solution from IBM

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Recently I blogged about my first pass at this technology on our Corporate blog, Technically Speaking.  I took a brief tour on my Macintosh because of my interest in Apple’s iOS and because I wanted to see how much of a hassle it would be to install. It really wasn’t difficult at all. Yes, it took more work than most end user apps but it was easy.

On a related note, the app touts its ability to create hybrid apps. I am still sorting this out. What, exactly, does this mean. Does it simply mean that there are ‘native’ components and ‘web’ components or is this something more sophisticated. In my view it is the latter.  The Worklight server provides the plumbing by which the native app, through the Worklight API, can access enterprise data.

This could mean that an organization can deploy apps that integrate corporate data into their mobile environment with relative ease and with the additional assurance that the data is managed securely.

Need to think about this some more but it looks very interesting.

Written by David Wilkerson

June 13, 2012 at 10:53 am